Sportmedizin-Nottwil - Sport Science

Sports science

Sports Medicine Nottwil regularly conducts and supervises sports science-related research projects. These studies focus on applied, user-oriented sports sciences, in particular performance and respiratory physiology.

  • Field research projects take place outside, or in the gymnasium with sports equipment and in conditions that resemble actual competition as closely as possible. The findings from field research experiments are directly incorporated into the training plans and programmes of our wheelchair athletes.

  • Accompanying research includes tests and experiments that are carried out in standardised and controlled conditions in the laboratory. Among other things, this research makes it possible to objectively record and document the effect of a supplement (e.g. beetroot juice) or training exercise (e.g. respiratory training) on performance. As a result, trainers and athletes can obtain important insight on how to improve their performance.

  • Sporting equipment plays a major role in the achievement of peak performance, especially for those competing in the ultra-competitive wheelchair sports of today. It is therefore crucial that we keep an eye on the latest technologies and materials, and continually upgrade sporting equipment accordingly – subject, of course, to all applicable rules and regulations. Examples of material research experiments include the optimisation of aerodynamics or the incorporation of lighter materials (such as carbon) into the production process.

  • The majority of the findings obtained from our studies are published in academic journals or presented at national and international conferences. We also regularly supervise dissertations and master’s theses in conjunction with various Swiss and international colleges and universities. Below you will find a selection of publications from the past 3 years.

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